Traffic, Writing & Editing

Getting Featured on Discover

Discover highlights the best content across WordPress, from sites hosted on WordPress.com to Jetpack-connected and self-hosted WordPress sites. It replaced the Freshly Pressed showcase in your Reader since it launched in fall 2015.

Managed and curated by the WordPress.com editorial team, Discover features daily editors’ picks, weekly features, and an ever-growing archive of posts published across WordPress blogs and websites.

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Discover showcases excellent original content of all types: from personal essays, humor, and poetry, to photography and art. It includes work from the entire WordPress universe, from promising new bloggers to leading publications hosted on WordPress.com VIP. We feature several picks daily — a small sampling among the millions of posts published each day. Please browse our editors’ picks, features, and topics to get a sense of the kind of content we highlight.

Here are general guidelines and best practices for bloggers (whether you’re interested in being featured or not):

Publish original content. You thought it up; you wrote it out. It’s yours. You can reference other sites — in fact, we encourage participating in a larger conversation. But give credit where credit is due. Use quotation marks or blockquotes when quoting others, and include links to articles you mention. If you’re unsure, refer to our tips for citing others.

Things not to include in your post: plagiarism, hate speech, fear-mongering, pornography, copyrighted images that belong to someone else, spam, or content that’s primarily advertorial in nature. Foul language is fine as long as it’s not gratuitous — go for impact, not shock value.

Offer a strong point of view. Sure, we care about the facts, but we can get the facts from hundreds of sites. We read your blog because we want to know what you have to say. We’re more likely to be sucked into a post that has a strong point of view and makes a reader think and respond. Offer your perspective; support your work with research when necessary; and be thoughtful, assertive, yet respectful in your discussion. Don’t just rehash the conversation — add to it.

Embrace your voice and style. WordPress is a diverse global community of voices. We publish personal musings, essays, fiction, poetry, comics, longreads, and much more. We write subtle and elegant prose; we pen opinionated commentaries on hot-button topics; we experiment with forward-thinking speculative fiction; and we publish academic research.

There are readers for all voices and styles. You could try to please everyone, but one, that never works, and two, that isn’t fun. Embrace who you are.

Use images when possible. While not every topic can be illustrated, most posts can and should have a visual element. (Most editors’ picks on Discover have featured images.) While images aren’t mandatory in your posts, they enhance your work.

We love when bloggers display original photographs in their posts. If you don’t have your own, we recommend sites that compile free-to-use images that don’t require attribution, and suggest sourcing Creative Commons images and embedding Getty Images.

Make it easy on the eyes. It doesn’t matter how fantastic your post is — if it’s difficult to read, your reader won’t stay. Here are some key elements of readability:

  • Breathing space. Break up your text and don’t let your paragraphs run too long. The line break is your friend.
  • Readable font. Be mindful of your font size and color: don’t make your reader squint, and avoid distracting colors.
  • Clean design. We encourage users to customize their blogs and make them their own. Watch out for too-busy backgrounds and cluttered sidebars with inactive widgets and unnecessary links.

Practice better blogging. Add relevant tags and categories. Craft a great headline. Strive to be 100% typo-free. If you’d like more tips and resources, head over to The Daily Post.

To recommend an excellent post you’ve read, or to nominate your very best piece of work, please use the contact form on the Discover About page.

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